Tooth Loss Solutions That Work - Endosteal Implant Cost And Effectiveness

There are several methods for dealing with the issue of tooth loss. The creation of dentures is one method, but it is not a permanent solution. Dental implants provide a solution that has permanency that dentures lack. There are three primary types of dental implant used to restore function when you lose teeth. These three implant types are known as the endosteal, subperiosteal, and the transosteal. Among those three types of implant, the endosteal implant is considered to be highly effective in both cost and implant reliability.

What is the Endosteal Implant?

The endosteal implant is a prosthetic tooth that is used to replace a missing tooth. The endosteal version of the implant process will utilize a prosthetic that is shaped similar to a natural tooth. It typically looks like a tooth sitting on top of a screw.

During the implant process, the dentist will implant the artificial tooth directly into the jawbone. The base of the implant, the part that looks like a screw, will fuse with the jawbone. This fusion process is known as osseointegration. The base and jawbone will become one structure after this process is complete, thus providing permanent tooth restoration. 

How is the Endosteal Implant Procedure Performed?

The actual procedure can be performed in one of three ways. The most common method is the three-stage procedure. In that procedure each of the three components of the endosteal implant the base, the abutment, and the crown are installed on different days. This procedure requires many months of healing between the first and second stage due to the necessity of allowing the base to fuse with the jawbone.

The other methods are the one-stage and two-stage procedures. The only difference is in how many components are installed at the time. In the one-stage procedure, everything is installed on the same day. In the two-stage procedure the base and the abutment are installed on the same day, and the crown is installed a few months later after the implant area has healed.

How Effective is the Endosteal Implant?

The endosteal implant from sites like http://www.waldendentistry.com is known to last for several decades if it is performed properly and there are no complications. The first person to receive this type of implant is Gosta Larsson. He received his implants, four total, in 1965. Those implants were still viable forty years later at the time of his death. You may need to occasionally change out the crown portion of the implant depending on the material used, but typically the implanted portion remains viable for a very long time.

How Much Does the Endosteal Implant Cost?

The reliability of the endosteal implant is stated to be 95% after five years from the time that it is implanted. It is known to last for decades if performed correctly. This means that the initial costs of having the implant installed are usually the primary costs associated with the procedure outside of standard dental visits. Unlike dentures, the endosteal implant does not need to be replaced. The average cost for a premium grade endosteal implant in the United States is $4250. The actual cost can range between $1500 to $10000, or more. This cost difference is dependent upon the type of materials used, the necessity of extra services, and the labor cost to perform the procedure.

The materials used vary. The base and abutment are most frequently made of titanium. The crown is often made from porcelain or dental acrylic. However, zirconium is also popular and more durable that porcelain. It can be used for the base and abutment as well. In some instances, the entire implant will be made of premium grade zirconium and will be installed on the same day instead of requiring three visits.

Extra services can be simple things like a necessary tooth extraction, or more complicated endeavors such as jawbone augmentation. The augmentation process is a method used to reinforce the jawbone so that it can accept an implant.

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Tips to Help With Pediatric Dental Anxiety

My child's first visit to the dentist was the stuff that nightmares are made of. She kicked. She screamed. By the end of the visit, she and I were exhausted. After talking to the dentist in a separate consultation, I learned some useful tips for helping her to prepare for her next visit. The dentist assured me the next visit would be better and it was. I started this blog to help other parents whose children are dealing with dental anxiety. With useful information from my dentist and other parents, you can learn techniques to make the visit to the dentist more exciting for your children.

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